South African Law Reform Commission

http://www.sanews.gov.za/south-africa/adult-sex-work-report-out-public-comment

Sexual Reproductive Justice Coalition (SRJC) Aids Health Foundation ( AHF) NACOSA

http://www.groundup.org.za/article/doctors-say-commission-ruling-sex-work-bad-hiv-prevention

Multi Party Womens Caucus

https://www.parliament.gov.za/press-releases/multi-party-womens-caucus-concerned-about-law-reform-commission-report-adult-prostitution

Sonke Gender Justice

https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/opinionista/2017-05-29-an-open-apology-to-sex-workers-in-south-africa/#.WTlZOeuGPIV

Oxfam

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/serra-sippel/all-women-all-rights—se_b_7940256.html

Peace Society

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/sex-workers-decriminalisation-of-prostitution-new-zealand-new-law-works-research-proves-sex-workers-a7761426.html

How PEPFAR’s anti-prostitution pledge impedes sex worker health

13 DEC 2016 

The US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) should end its anti-prostitution pledge. It prevents organisations that received PEPFAR money from advocating for law reform on sex work, which not only harms sex workers but is bad for health, especially HIV prevention and treatment.

PEPFAR is an initiative to diminish the impact of the global AIDS epidemic. During the 2016 International AIDS conference in Durban, PEPFAR pledged R5.7 billion ($410 million) towards the AIDS response in South Africa.2

Between 2004 and 2014, PEPFAR invested $4.2 billion (approximately R47 billion) into HIV prevention, treatment and care in South Africa, and by the end of 2015, had assisted the South African government to achieve these remarkable goals:

  • Anti-retroviral treatment for 3 million people
  • Voluntary medical male circumcision for HIV prevention for 472,047 men
  • HIV testing and counselling for more than 9.9 million people
  • Care and support for 592,260 orphaned and vulnerable children affected by HIV/AIDS
  • Anti-retroviral treatment for 226,369 pregnant women living with HIV to reduce the risk of parent-to-child transmission3

Yet, there’s a big problem with PEPFAR funding. PEPFAR recipients have to commit to a perplexing promise: to oppose sex work. According to the USA’s ‛Leadership Act’, all recipients of PEPFAR money have to sign an agreement with PEPFAR that commits them to the following:4

No funds … may be used to provide assistance to any group or organisation that does not have a policy explicitly opposing prostitution and sex trafficking.

No funds … may be used to promote or advocate the legalisation or practice of prostitution or sex trafficking.

Link: http://www.genderjustice.org.za/article/pepfars-anti-prostitution-pledge-impedes-sex-worker-health/

Legal happy ending eludes ‘those people’

Date: 16 October 2015

Article by: Mail & Guardian

According to the Sexual Offences Act of 1957, it is a crime to have unlawful carnal intercourse with any person for reward. Put aside all the sugar daddy and mommy transactional relationships – sex work in South Africa is still currently a criminal offence, classified as a “B-class” or less serious crime. Solomon Makgale, the South African Police Service’s national spokesperson, says that, after arresting alleged prostitutes, the police will charge them based on “loitering for [the] purpose of prostitution”.

The South African Law Reform Commission has been investigating legal models for sex work since 2000, and has released no concrete recommendations in the 15 years that it has been busy with this process.

In late August, activists, human rights defenders, lawyers, sex workers and academics from 17 organisations formed the Asijiki Coalition for the Decriminalisation of Sex Work in South Africa.

Asijiki is the isiZulu word for “no turning/looking back”. The coalition is made up of participants from a cross-section of society “who work towards safeguarding the human rights of sex workers everywhere”.

The coalition’s steering committee comprises the Sisonke Sex Worker Movement, the Women’s Legal Centre, the Sex Workers Education and Advocacy Taskforce (Sweat) and Sonke Gender Justice.

Link: http://mg.co.za/article/2015-10-15-legal-happy-ending-eludes-those-people

United to legalise sex work

Date: 31 August 2015

Article by: The Citizen

The call for decriminalising sex workers in South Africa has been strengthened with a newly formed coalition, which aims to put an end to horrifying situations being faced on a daily basis because of non-regulation.

More than 17 organisations have mobilised to create the coalition in order to challenge issues relating to human, legal and health rights.

The Asijiki Coalition for the Decriminalisation of Sex Work in South Africa brings together activists, human rights defenders, lawyers, sex workers and academics. Asijiki is the isiZulu word for “No turning or looking back”.

The coalition is made up of participants from a cross-section of society and who work towards safeguarding the human rights of sex workers everywhere.

It brings together the Sisonke Sex Worker Movement, Women’s Legal Centre, the Sex Worker Education and Advocacy Taskforce (Sweat) and Sonke Gender Justice.

“We now have a solid platform to raise issues on how to go about strengthening our call for decriminalisation without fear of stigmatisation and prejudice,” Sisonke’s Kholi Buthelezi said.

Link: http://citizen.co.za/660905/united-to-legalise-sex-work/

Coalition launched to decriminalise sex work

Date: 28 August 2015

Article by: GroundUp

In the wake of Amnesty International’s vote to adopt a policy that supports sex work decriminalisation, the Asijiki Coalition for the Decriminalisation of Sex Work was launched in Cape Town on 27 August. The coalition consists of sex workers, activists, advocates and defenders of human rights.

The coalition’s steering committee consists of the Sisonke Sex Worker Movement (Sisonke), the Women’s Legal Centre (WLC), the Sex Worker Education and Advocacy Taskforce (SWEAT) and Sonke Gender Justice.

At the launch, the national coordinator for Sisonke, Kholi Buthelezi, explained how the logo of Asijiki resembled a whip – Asijiki is an isiZulu word for “no turning / looking back”. The slogan was also used by activists during the anti-Apartheid struggle.

Link: http://www.groundup.org.za/article/coalition-launched-decriminalise-sex-work_3256/

Legalise prostitution to save SA sex workers’ lives

Date: 26 August 2015

Article by: Health24

More than 30 sex workers have been murdered – many of them brutally strangled and mutilated – throughout South Africa during the last year. Earlier this month, Amnesty International joined a growing number of organisations in calling for the decriminalisation of prostitution as the best way to protect the safety of those working in the industry around the world.

On 26 August 2015 the Sex Workers Education and Advocacy Taskforce (SWEAT) launched a new decriminalisation coalition called ‘Asijiki’. It aims at undoing the some of the adverse effects criminalisation has had on sex workers and society.

Link: http://www.health24.com/Lifestyle/Woman/Your-life/Legalise-prostitution-to-save-sex-workers-lives-20150825 

High time to decriminalise sex work

Date: 21 August 2015

Article by: Marlise Richter & Ruvimbo Tenga 

This month, international human rights body Amnesty International voted to “pursue a policy to protect the human rights of sex workers.” Its decision has generated much media attention and debate and has been opposed by many well-intentioned people and institutions.

Amnesty’s Questions and Answers explanation for why sex work should be decriminalised is well argued and easy to understand. If you oppose sex work, especially because you are concerned about human rights and the “exploitative” nature of the sex industry, please read it.

We wish to add a few points to Amnesty’s arguments to make it clear why sex work should be decriminalised in South Africa.

Link: http://www.groundup.org.za/article/high-time-decriminalise-sex-work_3230/

 

Sex Workers and Sex Work in South Africa

A Guide for Journalists and Writers

1 DEC 2014 

Sonke Gender Justice (2014). Sex Workers and Sex Work in South Africa: A Guide for Journalists and Writers. Sonke Gender Justice, Sisonke Sex Workers Movement, Sex Worker Education and Advocacy Taskforce, and Women’s Legal Resource Centre: Cape Town, South Africa.

The Guide has been compiled for journalists and writers involved in reporting on sex work. It sets out basic facts about the sex work industry in South Africa and contains sections on appropriate terminology, use of images and respectful interviewing techniques.

Link: http://www.genderjustice.org.za/publication/sex-workers-and-sex-work-in-south-africa/